How To Restore Missing Photoshop CS5 Features

When Adobe updated the recently released Photoshop CS5, it removed a bunch of filters and presets that were available in previous versions. I looked through the list. I can see why some of them were cut, such as the VM performance plugins that are no longer necessary with today’s larger, faster computers. Others left me wondering why they were dropped, like the Texturizer presets or the Web Photo Gallery plugin.

We’re still using CS4 in-house. I’m usually not quick to upgrade. In the past, even the most tempting Adobe upgrades often require some additional hardware upgrades to run well, whether it’s RAM, larger hard drive, faster CPU or just an entirely new machine.

Adobe has now made these features available as a separate free download. CreativePro has a complete list of these missing features, as well as more information.

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15 Best Places for Designers to Get Free Stock Photos Online

Here’s a link to a great article from SixRevisions.com about places to get free stock images online. I was actually only aware of about half of these, but will definitely check out others for upcoming projects. Typically, I use iStockPhoto.com or Dreamstime.com for microstock photography, but if you have a client that doesn’t even want to pay for microstock — let’s say it’s pro bono work — you might want to give some of these sites a look. The quality of the photography may vary and not be up to Getty Images standards, but for some projects it may work and save you and your client some cash.

Click here to read the article at sixrevisions.com

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Distracted

Hi, there!

As usual, there’s a lot going on right now. In addition to a huge prepress project with tight deadlines, I’ve been devoting much of my time to my other blog, Life In Lo-Fi.com. Basically, I’m moving a lot of the iPhone camera-related articles over there and focusing on design and type musings here.

The Epson 4880 proofer performed excellently for the previous job. We got great results and press check was a breeze. We were using Publication base stock and a custom profile provided by the printer. Results were close enough that the pressman had to do few moves on press day. Whew!

Our current big job will run three times as many proofs though the machine and will be on Commercial base proofing stock this time. The Commercial base is visibly brighter than the Publication base. I’ll be running to standard SWOP 2 densities throughout the project. After this job ends is when you get the full review of the 4880. Amazing machine so far!

That’s all I’ve got for now! Thanks for stopping in and I hpe to see you soon!

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Apple to Allow Demo-to-Paid In-app Upgrades

According to a recent TUAW — The Unofficial Apple Weblog post, Apple will finally allow developers to distribute, in essence, trial-to-paid versions of apps. As a user, you will be able to download an app for free and pay to upgrade features or to simply upgrade to the full version from within the app. These demo-to-paid versions of apps should start hitting the App Store soon.

This is a win-win for everyone, users and developers. Try before you buy apps have been around desktop computing for ages. Currently, if a developer wanted to offer a try-before-you-buy iPhone app, under the current Apple developer guidelines, they had to offer two versions of the app — a full-blown app for sale and a “lite” version that’s either ad-supported or with fewer features. They were considered two different apps with regards to numbers and ratings. As a user, you’d have to delete one app and install another. With no easy way to share data between the versions, this often meant that you lost the app’s data during the upgrade.

Now, we’ll be able to download one app — kick the tires — and if we like it, upgrade to the full version from within the app to take advantage of the full version. Developers only have to code and maintain one version of the app. As a user, I’m excited that I finally get to take the actual app out for a spin, rather than load the lite version, try, delete, either sync or lose my data, then download again. I think this will give developers a lot more flexibility in presenting a better initial user experience when downloading, previewing, and upgrading an app.

It’ll be interesting to see how this effects sales and app ratings in real life. In the past, I’ve noticed that the trial or lite version of an app typically gets lower ratings than its full-blown sibling. This is understandable because many more people are using the lite version to try an app out. If it doesn’t meet their needs, it gets deleted and gets a lower rating. I don’t think I’ve ever given five stars to a lite app that I was about to delete after trying. I wonder what will happen to app ratings when the group of tryers is merged with the group of buyers. I wonder how this will effect the usability of the App Store rating system when shopping for an app. This is something that Apple will need to work out.

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Review: Adobe Releases Photoshop.com Mobile for iPhone

Many iPhone apps have been compared to “Photoshop on the iPhone,” including Photogene and PhotoForge. Now, Adobe has released the real deal, Photoshop.com Mobile for iPhone. I like the app — it has some good features — but it isn’t what you’d expect. Adobe may have done better to brand it Photoshop Elements Mobile.

Read the complete review here at our sister site, LifeInLoFi.com

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Creative Director
typeadesign.com

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Arial vs. Helvetica

Arial vs. Helvetica. Fonts.com has an interesting article on the two here. It’s a brief but good read for a short background on these two famous (or infamous?) sans serif fonts.

We’ve all heard of the Arial® and Helvetica® typefaces, and have most likely used them both. Graphic designers either love or hate the designs. What’s the story behind these two polarizing typeface designs? Here’s the scoop!

Click here to read the entire article.

While I can see the differences between these two similar typefaces, I don’t believe the two typefaces are interchangeable. To me, Helvetica looks more cosmopolitan. I love the range of the entire Helvetica family, especially the Helvetica Neue family. Helvetica looks better than Arial when set with tight range kerning. With many more weights available than Arial, Helvetica offers more ways to create contrast in type, or to match the density of your type to your layout.

In contrast, as far as I know, there are three weights of Arial and then the Arial Narrow family. Much less opportunity to match the type to your layout. It’s no contest for me — Helvetica is the more attractive, more versatile typeface.

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The Face of Airports

Helvetica signage at Raleigh-Durham Intl. Airport

Helvetica signage at Raleigh-Durham Intl. Airport

Millions of people from different backgrounds, regions and countries move through airports every day. With so much diversity, it is essential for airport signage to communicate as clearly as possible to the greatest number of people.

For years, Helvetica was the face of the airports.

While I see a trend for airports to makeover themselves with new typefaces and colors, I’m still amazed at how many airports create their signage using the Helvetica typeface. Despite recent trends for airports to re-sign using more humanist faces, such as Myriad, Frutiger, and variants thereof, I still see a lot of airports using Helvetica.

Helvetica is ubiquitous. You don’t spend any time deciphering the font — you simply read the words and receive the message. Helvetica is clear. It’s a good typeface with easy to recognize characters. From a distance, in bold weight, a lower case m looks like a lower case m. A serif face with more contrast between the components of the letterforms may not read as clear from a distance.

Helvetica is universal and versatile. It’s all over the planet. I’ve seen the Cyrillic version used in Eastern Europe. While I was trying to decipher unfamiliar words, I was not distracted by an unfamiliar typeface. It’s recognizable.

Airports and transit depots in England have long used Gill Sans and, more recently, a custom humanist typeface to which it is similar. Dallas/Fort Worth, my home airport, changed over their signage from Helvetica to Myriad. The New York City airports have switched to humanist Frutiger as well. I like the look of these typefaces. Yellow signage and Frutiger — very European was my first thought. I think they add an air of sophistication to the signage and the environment. They add a subtle uniqueness. To me, these fonts are the “face” of those airports.

But I’m always amazed at the timeless utilitarianism and, despite its ubiquity, how effective Helvetica is as a communications tool.

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Marty Yawnick
Creative Director
typeadesign.com

– Post From My iPhone

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